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Michael W Lawlor
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Michael W Lawlor, MD,PhD

CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF WISCONSIN SINCE 2011

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    After graduating from Loyola University Chicago in 2004, Dr. Lawlor completed a residency in Anatomic Pathology and a fellowship in Neuropathology at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, and has since become board-certified in both of these fields. Dr. Lawlor pursued postdoctoral research training in the laboratory of Dr. Alan Beggs at Children’s Hospital Boston, where he focused on the pathological analysis of animal models of muscle disease and the development of treatments for X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    Since moving to the Medical College of Wisconsin September of 2011, Dr. Lawlor has continued to work closely with the Beggs laboratory while establishing clinical and research neuromuscular pathology laboratories. The work performed in his research laboratory at MCW has performed the pathological analyses for a number of preclinical trial studies for animal models of X-linked myotubular myopathy that are currently being performed worldwide, including anti-myostatin therapy, gene therapy, and protein replacement therapy. He has also recently begun evaluating myostatin inhibition in murine models of nemaline myopathy.

    In the spring of 2013, Dr. Lawlor’s laboratory became the site of the Congenital Muscle Disease Tissue Repository, which is meant to provide a central place for the donation and distribution of patient tissues, thanks to a generous donation by a collection of non-profit organizations. It is our hope that such a central resource for tissue storage and distribution will improve the pace of research in our field.

    Certifications

    • Anatomic Pathology, Neuropathology

    Areas of interest

    • Pathology
    • Congenital muscle disease
    • Neuromuscular disease