Tests & treatments

At Children’s, our team of infectious disease specialists provides services and treatments for a wide range of conditions.

Some of the specific treatment services we provide include:

HIV program

Established in 1992, our HIV program serves children, teens, pregnant women and women living with HIV throughout Wisconsin. We have cared for hundreds of patients and their families over the past 20 years and are proud to have given patients diagnosed with HIV greater hope for the future than ever before.

Read more about our HIV program >>

International Adoption Program

The Infectious Disease specialists work closely with the CHW International Adoption Clinic and your primary care provider to evaluate children after adoption. Children adopted internationally may have medical conditions that are different from those seen commonly in the United States. There may be questions on childhood vaccinations. The Infectious Disease specialists play an important role within your child’s care team in making recommendations about screening and treatment of infectious diseases and vaccinations.

Read more about the Children's Hospital International Adoption Program >> 

Rabies Program

Rabies is a dangerous disease that attacks the central nervous system and causes inflammation of the brain. It is usually fatal if allowed to progress untreated. Dr. Rodney Willoughby developed “The Milwaukee Protocol” which is a series of treatment recommendations for patients with rabies. Using the “Milwaukee Protocol, Children’s treated the first patient known to have survived rabies without receiving the rabies vaccine.

Read more about our Rabies Program >> 

The Midwest Respiratory Virus Program (MRVP)

Our respiratory virus lab developed tests to diagnose viral infections. We maintain data about the prevalence of viral infections in Southeast Wisconsin. Under the direction of Dr. Kelly Henrickson, the MRVP played a major role in identifying the causes of pandemic infection in Wisconsin, such as H1N1 influenza. The lab’s work is heavily supported by funding through national agencies like the CDC and NIH.