Providing schools with health education resources

Children spend much of their time in school. That’s why we’ve created innovative programs that allow us to partner with teachers and counselors to help deliver important information students need to grow up safe and healthy.

E-learning programs help teachers deliver health content

Healthy kids learn more. But first, they must learn to be healthy. And that's what Children's Hospital of Wisconsin's e-learning programs are all about. We're experts in children's health education, and we help students have fun, learn faster and live healthier.

Our programs for students in grades K4 through 8 focus on important health topics:

 Act Now!
Act Now!
Bullying prevention
 Mission: Health
Mission: Health
Health and wellness
 It's UR Choice
It’s UR Choice
Alcohol, tobacco
and other drugs prevention

Why choose our e-learning programs?

  • When kids are healthy and safe they learn more.
  • It's a cool and relevant way for students to learn with technology.
  • Programs are developed in collaboration with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and align with National Health Education Standards and Common Core State Standards.
  • Research proves our programs are effective in producing positive changes in knowledge, attitude and behavior.
  • Children's Hospital offers e-learning programs as part of our commitment to improving the health status of all children.

Discover how effective and easy-to-implement our online health education can be. Contact us to sign up for a free preview.

Project ADAM helps schools prepare for sudden cardiac arrest

Project ADAM aids schools across the nation in implementing public access defibrillation programs through education and other support. We help determine the need for automated external defibrillators (AEDs), secure funding, provide program implementation templates and assist with marketing.

In a situation where someone is in sudden cardiac arrest, every second counts. This project is credited with helping to save dozens of lives across the country, including students, by ensuring access to AEDs and individuals prepared to use them.

Project ADAM was started after a series of sudden deaths among high school athletes in southeast Wisconsin. The death of Adam Lemel, a 17-year-old Whitefish Bay, Wis., high school student, spurred his parents and childhood friend to work with the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin Herma Heart Center to create this program. ADAM stands for Automated Defibrillators in Adam’s Memory.